elcome to Azhar & Azhar, PLLC

Azhar & Azhar, PLLC is a law firm with several attorneys dedicated to working with a wide range of clients to provide the highest quality of legal services. Our firm’s clients are diverse, as we represent both individuals and companies for their legal needs. Our clients include professional athletes, leading scientists, world renowned authors, as well as hospitals, universities, restaurants, and consultancy groups. Our practice areas are broad, with a strong emphasis on Immigration and Nationality Law.

 

The attorneys at Azhar & Azhar law firm have previously enjoyed success at large law firms and have built a strong reputation in the Dallas/Fort Worth area for being honest, hardworking and responsive to their clients’ legal needs.

 

We invite you to review our website to learn more about our law firm and we welcome the opportunity to discuss your legal needs.

ase victories

  1. October 27, 2020 – NIW Petition Approved for Expert in Fume Exposure

    Our client, a citizen of Brazil, was in the U.S. on a J-1 visa. Attorney Furqan Sunny Azhar filed his NIW petition on the basis that his work was in the national interest. He argued that our client’s research in the sources of emissions and the risk of human exposure was particularly important for front-line healthcare workers. USCIS approved the I-140 NIW petition, thus paving the path for his permanent residency application.

  2. October 20, 2020 – L-1A Approved for Functional Manager with 5 Month Gap in 1 Year Requirement Abroad

    Our client, a citizen of India, was present in the U.S. on an H-4 visa. Before having come to the U.S., he worked as an Operations Manager outside the U.S. However, during the 18 months that he was abroad, he spent 5 of those months inside the U.S. in H-4 status. Also, as an Operations Manager, he only directly managed 2 people. Furqan Azhar filed his L-1A and argued that he met the requirements of a “Functional Manager,” and that his 5 months stay in the U.S. while on H-4, did not disrupt the continuity of his requirement that he serve abroad for at least 1 year as a manger. USCIS approved the L-1A petition without an RFE.

  3. October 15, 2020 – I-612 Persecution Waiver Approved After Previous Asylum Denial

    Our client, a citizen of Afghanistan, had filed an affirmative I-589 asylum application. USCIS denied that application and stated in their denial decision that the client had not adequately proven that he had been the victim of past persecution. Now married to a US citizen, our client filed an I-612 and again argued that he met the requirements of a persecution waiver. After an RFE, USCIS approved the I-612, thus paving the path for permanent residency based on his married to a US citizen.

  4. September 8, 2021 – H-1B Cap Case Approved for Change of Status, Despite Previous H-1B Revocation

    Client filed an H-1B for their employee under the Master’s cap. USCIS approved the H-1B, but after having filed a renewal, USCIS determined that the school where the employee graduated from was not accredited. Therefore, USCIS issued a Notice of Intent to Revoke. Meanwhile, the employer filed a new cap subject H-1B, and was selected in the random lottery.

    Attorney Furqan Azhar filed an H-1B extension using SOC code 15-1199 and an Oct. 1 start date, before USCIS could revoke the previous H-1B. USCIS approved the H-1B with an I-797A, allowing the employee to stay in the U.S. in H-1B status, with a new bachelor’s cap subject H-1B, despite the likely eventual revocation of the original H-1B.

  5. September 25, 2020 – PERM Re-filed and AOS Approved After Previous I-140 Denial

    Our clients, citizens of Pakistan, were the beneficiaries of an I-140 petition. However, USCIS issued a notice of intent to deny the I-140, because the employment information did not match the DS-160 information. Rather than risk a denial based on a fraud finding, the attorneys at A&A withdrew the I-140, then filed a new PERM for the spouse. That new PERM was certified, and the I-140 was approved. Therefore, the beneficiaries were ultimately able to adjust their status to permanent residency.