US Immigration


images3US immigration law includes employment immigration, family immigration, refugee law, citizenship and nationality law, and deportation defense.

 

The Department of Homeland Security allows for numerous types of employment based visas. In order to understand which type of visa best suits a foreign national, it is important to understand the foreign national’s experience and educational qualifications as they relate to each company's needs. We assist employers and employees in all types of employment based visas, including professionals (H-1B), managers and executives (L-1), investors (E-2, B-5), those with extraordinary ability (O, EB-1), foreign medical graduates (J), religious workers (R), Canadian and Mexican professionals (TN), labor certification, skilled and unskilled labor, as well as employment authorization.

 

The Department of Homeland Security allows for numerous types of employment based visas. In order to understand which type of visa best suits a foreign national, it is important to understand the foreign national’s experience and educational qualifications as they relate to each company's needs. We assist employers and employees in all types of employment based visas, including professionals (H-1B), managers and executives (L-1), investors (E-2, B-5), those with extraordinary ability (O, EB-1), foreign medical graduates (J), religious workers (R), Canadian and Mexican professionals (TN), labor certification, skilled and unskilled labor, as well as employment authorization.

 

Sponsoring a family member is an important right of U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents (Green Card holders), however, only certain relationships serve as a basis for sponsorship. Therefore it is important to understand which family members qualify for sponsorship. We assist in family relative petitions including fiancé visas (K-1), spousal visas (K-3), consular processing and waivers.

 

If you or your family member has been the victim of torture or persecution in your home country, or have good reason to believe that you would be if you were forced to return, you may be eligible for Asylum in the United States. We represent people from Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America who seek refuge in the United States for fear of governmental persecution based on race, religion, nationality, political opinion or their particular social group.

 

U.S. citizenship can be obtained in a number of ways, and eligibility for citizenship is often times a fact intensive and complicated process. Lawful permanent residents may apply for naturalization after a certain number of years, depending on one’s marital status or even military service. Children may obtain U.S. citizenship at birth, even if born outside the U.S., or while they are minors through their parent’s naturalization.

 

One should never delay in applying for citizenship, especially considering that lawful permanent residents can encounter criminal issues or potentially abandon their residency should they leave the U.S. for too long. Therefore, because U.S. citizens are not deportable from the U.S., we encourage those eligible for U.S. citizenship to immediately apply for naturalization, certificate of citizenship, or a U.S. passport.

 

Deportation defense is arguably the most complex and sophisticated area of immigration law. The Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) and Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) play a decisive role in determining whether someone has any relief or right to stay in the United States once placed in deportation proceedings. The U.S. immigration court system, however, provides for different avenues and grounds for relief, but without an experienced attorney your rights can be lost. As a result, it is extremely important to understand one’s legal rights once deportation against an alien has been initiated by speaking with an experienced immigration attorney who will help you navigate the tricky waters of being placed before a federal immigration judge.